Asian Americans Advancing Justice - LA

Building upon the legacy of the Asian Pacific American Legal Center

Episode 1: Breaking Ground

In the era of U.S. expansion, new immigrants arrive from China, India, Japan, the Philippines, and beyond. Eventually barred by anti-Asian laws, they become America's first "undocumented immigrants". Undeterred, they continue to build railroads, take their fight for equality to the US Supreme Court, and even dazzle on the silver screen.

Lesson Plans
Grades 9-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
After the Philippine-American War ended in 1902, Americans became fascinated by the natives of the newly acquired territory which led to the development of anthropological exhibits showcasing what “primitive” life was like in the Philippines.

Grades 7-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History, World History
With dreams of having a better life, thousands of Chinese risked their lives across the Pacific Ocean to join in the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad from 1863 to 1869.

Grades 9-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
Signed on May 6th, 1882 by President Chester A. Arthur, the Chinese Exclusion Act was the first law to explicitly limit immigration based on race.

Grades 7-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History, World History
This lesson will cover the story of the Tape family, Chinese immigrants and their American-born children residing in San Francisco, California. Joseph and Mary Tape attempted to enroll their daughter, Mamie, at Spring Valley Primary, an all-white school, and were denied based on their race.

Grades 7-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
This lesson provides students with an introduction to Angel Island. The lesson begins with students completing a timeline of Chinese immigration to America. The progression of events will help them understand the escalation of anti-Chinese sentiment in America culminating with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the first law that restricted immigration based on nationality.

Grades 8-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
This lesson is an exploration of how South Asian Muslims immigrated and built lives in the U.S. during the time of Chinese and Asian exclusion. Although initially classified as “white,” orientalist discourse cast South Asians as “others” who found welcome in African American communities.

Grades 9-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
Three important lawsuits brought by Asian Americans with important consequences for American citizenship, equal protection, and racial identity: Yick Wo, Wong Kim Ark, Thind.

FOR LEGAL HELP

Advancing Justice-LA's helplines prioritize assistance to low-income persons in the following areas of law: family, immigration, public benefits, employment, housing, and civil rights. 

English: 888.349.9695
需要協助嗎: 800.520.2356
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Tagalog: 855.300.2552
ต้องการความช่วยเหลือ: 800.914.9583

 

Our mission is to advocate for civil rights, provide legal services and education, and build coalitions to positively influence and impact Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders and to create a more equitable and harmonious society.