Asian Americans Advancing Justice - LA

Building upon the legacy of the Asian Pacific American Legal Center

Lesson Plan: Fight for Just Immigration in a Nation of Native Americans and Immigrants

 

GRADE
9-12
SUBJECT
CLDE/ELL/ESL/ELD
English Language Arts
NUMBER OF LESSONS
10
LESSON 1
UNIT INTRODUCTION, ACADEMIC VOCABULARY,
READER’S ANTICIPATION GUIDE
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
RL 9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.

Language Objective: Students will be able to read out-loud and write the definition of 15 words using graphic organizers.
MATERIALS
1. Academic Vocabulary
2. Actions are Illegal, Never People. TEDxMidAtlantic. (YouTube.com.) Run Time 16:48.
Source: https://youtu.be/tmz9cCF0KNE.
MATERIALS NOT INCLUDED
1. Flashcards
2. Scissors
3. Tape/glue
ACTIVITY 1: Quick-Write and Discussion (10-15 minutes)
1. List of activities.
 
In order to connect to students’ prior knowledge and introduce some of the themes of the unit, have students complete a “Quick-Write” for the following question: Who is the immigrant? Justin Bieber or Selena Gomez.
2.
In their notebooks, have students answer the question silently and independently using the following sentence stem. Students do no need to answer the “because” just yet.
 
__________ is the immigrant because ______________.
3.
Have students turn to their shoulder partners and share their answer in a complete sentence. Then, cold-call 2-3 students to read their complete sentences out loud for the class.
4.
Share why Justin Bieber is the immigrant (refer to Unit Slides, Slide 7). Have students correct and/or answer the “because” part of their sentence stem (he was born in Canada).
5.
Now, have students draw a circle map with the words “Illegal Alien” in the middle. Have students write 3-5 words or phrases regarding the following questions:
 
Who are they? (They are _____________)
 
Where do they come from? (They come from _______________)
 
What level of education do they have? (The level of education they have is _______________)
 
How does the media portray them? (On television and in movies they are )
6.
Give the students 1-2 minutes to silently and independently brainstorm and write down their words and phrases.
7.
Have students turn to their shoulder partners to check each other’s work and fulfill at least 3 words/phrases.
8.
Have students write down their answers in complete sentences (using sentence stems above).
9.
Have all students stand up and find a new seat (seats in-play involve only those utilized by other students). Whoever they sit next to will be their new partner. Have each student read out loud their answers in complete sentences.
10.
Cold-call 2-3 students to share their answers with the class. .
11.
Introduce Jose Antonio Vargas as an undocumented Filipino journalist and play his Tedx Talk, starting at 5:58 and ending at 12:31. (refer to Unit Slide 11)
 
Discuss the difference between the terms “illegal alien” and “undocumented immigrant” with the class.
ACTIVITY 2: Academic Vocabulary (45-50 minutes)
1. Hand out the “Academic Vocabulary” worksheet. Have students repeat each word after you. Have students choral read definitions and sentences (refer to handout).
2.
Make sure each student has 15 flashcards. Show students how to create and format their Academic Vocabulary Index cards (refer to Unit Slides 14-16).
3.
Have students cut and paste from the Vocab handout onto the flashcards. If materials (scissors/glue/tape) aren’t available, have students write and draw onto their flashcards.
4.
Students will need to create an additional example using the word. Circulate and help students complete this sentence.
5.
Have students clear their desks. Hand out 1 flash card per student. Have students complete the Demonstration of Learning (3-5 minutes) (refer to Unit Slide 17)
6.
Share the correct answers with the students.
7.
Assess students D.O.L, and plan for more time on Vocabulary or not.
LESSON 2
IMMIGRATION TIMELINE PRE-READING ACTIVITY,
ACADEMIC CONVERSATIONS
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
SL 9-10.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
“Students will present and discuss ideas with classmates, based upon an informational text, supporting opinions with textual detail.”

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and speak in academic conversations using a text with partners.
“Students will be able to read out-loud and answer questions through writing with a partner.”

MATERIALS
1. Immigration Timeline Worksheet
2. Immigration Timeline Student Version
3. Immigration Timeline Teacher Version
4. Undocumented Americans: Inside the Immigration Debate (YouTube/Time).
Run time 3:21. Source: https://youtu.be/aPi3tMmHXIc
MATERIALS NOT INCLUDED
1. Additional blank pages (to build timeline)
2. Scissors
3. Tape/glue
ACTIVITY 1: Quick-write and Discussion (10-15 minutes)
1. List of activities.
In order to connect to students’ prior knowledge and introduce some of the themes of the unit, have students complete a “Quick-Write” for the following question (refer to Unit Slide 21):
Are Latinxs the only people worried about immigration?
a.
Use the following sentence stems to help students answer the question:
b.
Yes, because _______________.
c.
No, because ________________.
d.
Have students turn to their shoulder partner and share their response in a full sentence.
e.
Select a few students to share their response to the class.
2.
Let students know you will be showing the video “Undocumented Americans: Inside the Immigration Debate” Ask students to create a list numbered 1-5.
Students will have to listen for all the countries they hear mentioned and write them down. They need at least five.
Show the first 15 seconds of “Undocumented Americans: Inside the Immigration Debate” (refer to Unit Slide 22). Source: https://youtu.be/aPi3tMmHXIc
3.
After students have written down countries, have them create a full sentence using the following sentence stem:
a.
Undocumented immigrants come from _____________________.
b.
Share with partners, and then with the class.
4.
Have students create a T-chart titled “Country/Continent and Percentage of Undocumented Immigrants”. Show students Unit Slide 23 and have them fill in the information accordingly onto their T-charts.
a.
Ask students one more time: Is immigration a Latinx issue?
b.
No/Yes, because ____________ percent of undocumented immigrants come from_______________?
c.
Have students answer with evidence from the percentages in Slide 23.
5.
Students will turn to their partners and share their answers in complete sentences. Then, call out a few students to share with the class.
ACTIVITY 2: Pre-Reading Timeline Activity Quick-Write and Discussion (25-35 minutes)
1. Using the Timeline Activity Student Version handout and the Timeline Activity Worksheet, students will cut and paste each historic block onto their Timeline Activity Worksheet (and additional sheets of paper).
You will need at least 4 sheets of paper to complete this timeline (depending on space used).
2.
After timelines are completed, have students get into groups of 3-4. Each group is to review by highlighting 3 events from National, 3 from Ethnic, and 2 from Untold Stories.
3.
Each group will select the two most important/interesting events. Students should answer the following questions on paper as they select their top two events (refer to Unit Slide 27):
a.
What events did you choose? Why? (We chose _______ and _______ because_____).
b.
Did any events surprise you? Why? (This event surprised us because _____.)
c.
What do these events have to do with immigration? (These events are related to immigration because ______________________________).
ACTIVITY 3: Academic Conversation - Timeline Activity Quick-Write and Discussion (10-20 minutes)
1. Hand out Academic Conversation handouts.
2.
Have students cut each manipulative out and fold in half to create a “flashcard.” Add tape/glue where necessary to keep card folded.
3.
Review each manipulative with students.
4.
Practice having academic conversations with students as the class reviews each group’s two events selected from the timeline.
5.
Have students clear their desks. Hand out 1 flash card per student. Have students complete the Demonstration of Learning (3-5 minutes) (refer to Unit Slides 29 and 30). It is possible give students cut out pieces of each sentence and have students order them accordingly.
6.
Share the correct answers with the students.
7.
Assess students D.O.L, and plan for more time spent on Academic Conversations.
LESSON 3
PRE-READING TO DEFENDING THE UNPOPULAR IMMIGRANT
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
SL 9-10.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
“Students will present and discuss ideas with classmates, based upon an informational text, supporting opinions with textual detail.”

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and speak in academic conversations using a text with partners.
“Students will be able to read out-loud and answer questions through writing with a partner.”

MATERIALS
1. Illegal Immigration? We Asked Native Americans About It (AJ+/YouTube). Run time 1:20. Source: https://youtu.be/bu6gbmoMQSE
2. “Pio Pico - Last Governor of Mexican California.” Los Angeles Almanac, laalmanac.com. Web, accessed Feb. 16, 2017. http://www.laalmanac.com/history/hi05s.htm
3. Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Student Version
4. Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Teacher Version
MATERIALS NOT INCLUDED
1. Word-to-Word Dictionaries in 1L (first language of students)
ACTIVITY 1: Discussion (10-15 minutes)
1. In order to introduce some of the themes of Defending the Unpopular Immigrant unit, conduct a discussion around the following:
a. Pose the following question to the students: Who said this quote?
b.
The following is the original version of the quote:
“What are we to do then? Shall we remain supine, while these daring strangers are overrunning our fertile plains, and gradually outnumbering and displacing us? Shall these incursions go on unchecked, until we shall become strangers in our own land?”
c.
The following is a version of the quote that may be easier to understand for the students:
“What do we do now? Do we let all these illegal immigrants into our lands? Do we let ourselves become strangers in our lands?”
d.
Source: Given Place Media. “Pio Pico - Last Governor of Mexican California.” Los Angeles Almanac, laalmanac.com, 2017. Web, accessed June 10, 2017. http://www.laalmanac.com/history/hi05s.php.
e. Have students turn to their shoulder partner and share their response in a full sentence.
f. Select a few students to share their response to the class.
g. Then, discuss the person who originally said the quote, Pio de Jesus Pico.
Pio de Jesus Pico was the last governor of Alta California when California was under Mexican rule.
He was shocked and upset at the growing number of European immigrants in his province. He stated the quote provided above as his response.
2. Let students know you will be showing the video “Illegal Immigration? We Asked Native Americans About It.”
Ask students to write the following two questions on a piece of paper
a. According to this video, who are the original people in America?
b. Who were the first undocumented immigrants of America? Source: https://youtu.be/bu6gbmoMQSE (Run Time 3:11)
3. After students have written down the questions and watched the video, have them write their answers in the following format:
a. The original people of America are ______________________.
b. The first undocumented immigrants of America were ______________.
c. The first European settlers:
Spanish: 1493
English: 1607

Encourage them to share with partners, and then with the class

4. Tell the students about the author of Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Bill Ong Hing. (refer to Unit Slide 36)
a. Attorney
b. Professor of Law
c. Has helped defend immigrants from Mexico, China, Cambodia, and many other countries Encourage them to share with partners, and then with the class
d. Author of Defending the Unpopular Immigrant
ACTIVITY 2: Pre-Reading Activity: Reading and Discussion (35-45 minutes)
1. Provide the students with Word-to-Word dictionaries in 1L. Have students break into groups of 2-3. Each group is to scan the entire text (work from end to beginning of text) to identify 8 unfamiliar words. Ask students to compile a list.
2. After students have compiled their lists of unfamiliar words, work together as a class to briefly define each word.
3. Each group will then read the titles and subtitles of Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Student Version (only the titles and subtitles!). Ask students to make a prediction about what they think the article is about. Have the students respond in the following way:
I think this article is about ____________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________
4. Let the students know you will begin reading the article the following class.
LESSON 4
DEFENDING THE UNPOPULAR IMMIGRANT (PART 1)
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
Bill Ong Hing, Author of "Defending the Unpopular Immigrant
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
SL 9-10.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
“Students will present and discuss ideas with classmates, based upon an informational text, supporting opinions with textual detail.”

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and speak in academic conversations using a text with partners.
“Students will be able to read out-loud and answer questions through writing with a partner.”

MATERIALS
1. Identifying Themes Worksheet
2. Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Student Version
3. Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Teacher Version
MATERIALS NOT INCLUDED
1. Word-to-Word dictionaries in 1L (first language of students)
ACTIVITY 1: Modeling (5-10 minutes)
1. In this lesson, the class will begin reading Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Student Version text that they scanned for unfamiliar vocabulary in the previous lesson. In order to begin reading as a class, the teacher will model reading paragraphs 1 and 2 of the text.
2. Instruct the class to choral-read paragraph 3.
ACTIVITY 2: Reading the text (35-45 minutes)
1. Point out to the students that there are various questions, graphic organizers, and tasks on the margins that they should complete as they read.
2. The students should also work through the “Identifying Themes” worksheet as they read. Mention that there are four main themes, and as they read, they should write down textual evidence that supports each theme. They should find at least two quotations per theme.
3. For the rest of the class period, have the students partner up with 1-2 other students and read paragraphs 4 through 25. Remind them to complete the tasks on the margins after each paragraph chunk. The seven chunks are broken down as follows:
a.
P# 4
b.
P# 5-7
c.
P# 8-10
d.
P# 11-12
e.
P# 13-14
f.
P# 15-20
g.
P# 21-25
4. After a group finishes reading each chunk, they should raise their hand to notify the teacher. The teacher should check to make sure the group is finished with their chunk (give check marks, stickers) and give the group the go-ahead to move on to the next chunk of reading until they finish all seven chunks.
a.
Let the groups know it is okay if they do not finish all seven chunks by the end of the class period. They should read at their own pace, and the class will continue reading the text in the next class period.
ACTIVITY 3: Conclusion (5 minutes)
1. As a closing activity, gather the class back together 5 minutes before class ends and encourage a few students to share with the class what they have learned so far from reading Defending the Unpopular Immigrant. Encourage them to connect this to one of the four themes.
a.
Encourage different students to share what they are looking forward to learning more about.
LESSON 5
DEFENDING THE UNPOPULAR IMMIGRANT (PART 2)
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
Bill Ong Hing, Author of "Defending the Unpopular Immigrant
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
SL 9-10.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
“Students will present and discuss ideas with classmates, based upon an informational text, supporting opinions with textual detail.”

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and speak in academic conversations using a text with partners.
“Students will be able to read out-loud and answer questions through writing with a partner.”

MATERIALS
1. Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Student Version
2. Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, Teacher Version
MATERIALS NOT INCLUDED
1. Word-to-Word dictionaries in 1L (first language of students)
ACTIVITY 1: Modeling (5-10 minutes)
1. In this lesson, the class will continue reading Defending the Unpopular Immigrant, student version text that they began in the last class period.
2. Before beginning the reading, do a warm-up with the students that allows them to share what they remember or learned from the last class. Have the students write the following sentence down with their response:
One thing I learned from reading Defending the Unpopular Immigrant so far is __________.
ACTIVITY 2: Reading the text (35-45 minutes)
1. Check in with the students beforehand to check if there are students who did not finish all seven chunks from the previous class period. Go over the paragraphs that they did not finish as a class and encourage the students to explain to each other what the chunks were about.
2. Then, remind the students that there are various questions, graphic organizers, and tasks on the margins that they should complete as they read.
3. Remind the students that they should be working through the “Identifying Themes” worksheet as they read. Remind them that there are four main themes, and as they read, they should write down textual evidence that supports each theme. They should find at least two quotations per theme.
4. Have the students partner up with 1-2 students whom they did not partner with in the last class and read paragraphs 26 through 58. Remind them to complete the tasks on the margins after each paragraph chunk. The seven chunks are broken down as follows:
a.
P# 26-32
b.
P# 33-36
c.
P# 37-39
d.
P# 40-41
e.
P# 42-44
f.
P# 45-48
g.
P# 49-52
h.
P# 53
i.
P# 54
j.
P# 55-58
5. After a group finishes reading each chunk, they should raise their hand to notify the teacher. The teacher should check to make sure the group is finished with their chunk (give check marks, stickers) and give the group the go-ahead to move on to the next chunk of reading until they finish all seven chunks.
ACTIVITY 3: Conclusion: Academic Conversations (5 minutes)
1. As a closing activity, gather the class back together 5 minutes before class ends and encourage a few students to share with the class about what they learned and encourage them to connect this to one of the four themes.
a.
Encourage the students to keep thinking about the themes they learned from the reading, and mention that you will be talking about the themes during the next class period.
b.
Use the following questions to drive the discussion or get it started:
What does the 2002 repatriation agreement do?
Should the U.S. deport ex-criminals like Many?
Has Many paid for his errors though prison time?
Do deportations break apart families? How?
Why is breaking families apart a problem?
Does Many deserve a second chance?
LESSON 6
BORDERS AND LAWS
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
SL 9-10.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
“Students will present and discuss ideas with classmates, based upon an informational text, supporting opinions with textual detail.”

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and speak in academic conversations using a text with partners.
“Students will be able to read out-loud and answer questions through writing with a partner.”

MATERIALS
1. “We are More American” by Los Tigres Del Norte (Copies of lyrics to “Somos Mas Americanos”/ “We are More American” by Los Tigres Del Norte)
2. Los Tigres Del Norte. We are More American. YouTube.com. Run Time 3:27. Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsOPbN8ViEg
ACTIVITY 1: Icebreaker (5-10 minutes)
1. In this lesson, we will connect the lessons learned in Defending the Unpopular Immigrant to contemporary political events.
2. Display the slide that shows the original map of Mexico.
3. Discuss the phrase “We did not cross the border; the border crossed us.”
a.
Have the students turn to a partner and explain their initial understanding of the quote.
b.
Explain that you will discuss the quote as a class after the next activity, where they will listen to a song.
ACTIVITY 2: We are More American (15-25 minutes)
1. Begin this activity by introducing the band, Los Tigres Del Norte.
2. Pass out the lyrics to “We are More American” by Los Tigres Del Norte.
a.
Instruct the students to follow along with the lyrics as they watch and listen to the video.
b.
Ask them to take note of anything that stands out to them.
3. Play the “We are More American” video by Los Tigres Del Norte: Run Time 3:28. Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsOPbN8ViEg
4. Begin the discussion by breaking up the students into groups of three. Ask them to ponder the following questions:
a.
According to the lyrics, who is the invader? Why?
b.
After hearing the song, what does “We did not cross the border, the border crossed us” mean to you?
c.
What is the “hard-working man” made up of? Cite evidence from the lyrics.
5. Bring the students back together as a class to discuss their thoughts. Ask the students how they think this song connects to past lessons.
ACTIVITY 3: Examining Laws (10-20 minutes)
1. Ask the students to define the word ‘law.’
2. On the board, divide the board into ‘good’ and ‘bad.’
a.
Ask the students to provide examples of good laws and bad laws.
b.
Provide examples for the students if they need guidance.
3. Make the connection between good/bad laws and the people who have power to enact them.
ACTIVITY 4: Conclusions (5 minutes)
1. As a closing activity, go around in a circle and have each student express something new that they learned from the class that day.
LESSON 7
STARTING YOUR ESSAY
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
 
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
RI 9-10.3
Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
“Students will use historical context to analyze an informational text’s meaning.”
SL 9-10.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
“Students will present and discuss ideas with classmates, based upon an informational text, supporting opinions with textual detail.”
 
Language Objective: Students will be able to write and speak in academic conversations using a text with partners.
“Students will be able to read out-loud and answer questions through writing with a partner.”
MATERIALS
1. “Cut & Match” Quotations Essay Worksheet
2. Essay Template Worksheet
3. Scissors
ACTIVITY 1: Prompt Overview (5-10 minutes)
1. Begin the class by letting the class know they will begin their essay for this unit.
2. Read the Essay Prompt out loud to the class from Unit Slide (Slide 55): “What is your vision for a world with moral and ethical immigration laws?”.
a.
Ask the students to share their understanding of ‘moral and ethical immigration laws.’ Write their ideas on the board.
3. Explain to the students that half of the essay will require them to mix and match textual evidence into the essay template.
4. The other half will require them to write and create their own ideas and sentences.
ACTIVITY 2: Matching Textual Evidence (15-25 minutes)
1. Pass out the Cut & Match Quotations Essay Worksheet, the Essay Template Worksheet, and scissors.
2. Instruct the students to cut out the quotations and match them to the proper paragraph and sentence in the essay template.
ACTIVITY 3: Creating Our Own Ideas (15-25 minutes)
1. After the students finish the cut & match activity, instruct them to move onto the section where they can create and write their own sentences and ideas.
2. Go over an example as a class.
a.
In my experience, my family immigrated here because…
b.
Exemplify an answer by sharing a piece of your personal story.
ACTIVITY 4: Conclusions (5 minutes)
1. Inform the students that the work they do not complete in class will be assigned for homework and is due the next class period.
2. Encourage the students to ask any questions they have in class so they can complete the first draft of their essay by the next class period.
LESSON 8
REVISING YOUR ESSAY
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
RI 9-10.3
Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
“Students will use historical context to analyze an informational text’s meaning.”
SL 9-10.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
“Students will present and discuss ideas with classmates, based upon an informational text, supporting opinions with textual detail.”

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and speak in academic conversations using a text with partners.

“Students will be able to read out-loud and answer questions through writing with a partner.”
MATERIALS
1. Rough Drafts of Essays
ACTIVITY 1: Idea Share-Out (10-15 minutes)
1. Begin the class by instructing the students to take out the completed first draft of their essays.
2. Ask each student to share one sentence from any section of their essay where they were able to share a piece of their personal background/story.
ACTIVITY 2: Formatting Your Essay (15-25 minutes)
1. Inform the students that now they are done with their handwritten first draft, they are to type their entire essay.
2. Go over the formatting guidelines and the essay rubric:
Typed, Double-spaced
Font: Times New Roman
Font Size: 12
1’ margins
MLA citations (For example, “_________________” (Last Name, Pg#).
ZERO grammatical mistakes – 10 points
1-3 grammatical mistakes – 8
4-5 grammatical mistakes – 5
5+ grammatical mistakes – 3
Activity 3: Defining Editing and Revising (10-15 minutes)
1. Inform the students that they will spend the next class period peer-editing/peer-revising their essays. Go over the definitions of editing and revising:
a.
Editing: Fixing errors on the sentence level. Spelling, grammar, punctuation, and word choice.
b.
Emphasize that editors suggest changes, but it is the writer who fixes them
c.
Revision: Examines paper as a whole: considers strengths/weaknesses, arguments, organization, voice, as well as mechanics. Question-based: expanding ideas, challenging arguments
d.
Emphasize that as opposed to editing, revision is more about developing ideas than “fixing” problems.
ACTIVITY 4: Open Question & Answer (15 minutes)
1. With the remaining class time, allow the students to work on their essays individually and ask any questions they might have while you are available to answer them.
2. Remind them that they should be prepared to peer-edit/peer-revise essays during the next class period and to come with a fully typed essay.
LESSON 9
PEER-EDITING & PEER-REVISING
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
STANDARDS ADDRESSED
RI 9-10.3
Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
“Students will use historical context to analyze an informational text’s meaning.”
SL 9-10.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
“Students will present and discuss ideas with classmates, based upon an informational text, supporting opinions with textual detail.”

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and speak in academic conversations using a text with partners.
“Students will be able to read out-loud and answer questions through writing with a partner.”

MATERIALS
1. Typed Rough Drafts of Essays
ACTIVITY 1: Peer Editing and Peer-Revising (55 minutes)
1. Instruct the students to take out their typed essays.
2. Begin the class by quickly reminding them what peer-editing and peer-revising is about.
3. Push your classroom tables/desks into a circle.
4. Inform the class that everyone will get a chance to see each other’s essays because they will be passing their papers to the right. Instruct the students as follows:
a.
With each paper you receive and pass on, you should write 1 comment in the margin
b.
Before writing any comments, look for the following:
Read the introduction. Is there a clear thesis/main argument? Does the writer answer the question clearly?
Evidence: Scan the essay for textual details/quotes. Does the author refer back to the text?
Conclusion: Read the ending. Is there a clear conclusion? Or does it just… stop?
c.
Inform the students that they may also look for mechanics. Check for spelling/word choice. If it looks wrong, circle it. If the sentence doesn’t make sense or is incomplete/run-on, put it in [brackets]. Let the author fix errors.
5. Begin the activity. Allow the activity to run for 55 minutes, then stop the activity and instruct the students to hand the papers to their original owners.
ACTIVITY 2: Conclusions (5 minutes)
1. During the last five minutes of class, answer any remaining questions about the essay.
2. Remind the students that the final draft of the essay will be due at the start of the next class period. The same formatting rules apply as the typed rough draft of the essay.
3. Inform the students that the next class period will involve individual and group reflection about Defending the Unpopular Immigrant unit.
LESSON 10
UNIT REFLECTION
Suggested Time:
60 minutes
ACTIVITY 1: Individual Reflection (40 minutes)
1. Before you begin the reflection, instruct the students to turn in their typed final essays.
2. Organize the classroom desks/tables into a circle.
3. Instruct the students to take out two pieces of paper and a pencil/pen.
4. Instruct the students to fold their two pieces of paper in half.
5. Project the five reflection questions (refer to Slide 66) and instruct the students to copy one question at the top of each box that they folded.
a.
What have you learned from this unit?
b.
How have your reading/writing skills improved?
c.
How have your ideas changed about immigration and Asian immigrants?
d.
How should the United States treat immigrants?
e.
Can a person be illegal?
6. After copying all the questions, they are to answer the question by filling the box with a half-page response.
7. Provide some sentence starters if they are stuck:
a.
What I have learned from this unit is…
b.
I improved my reading/writing skills by…
c.
My ideas about immigration and Asian immigrants have changed by…
d.
The United States should treat immigrants…
e.
In my opinion, a person…
ACTIVITY 2: Group Reflection (20 minutes)
1. For the final 20 minutes of class, the students will share part of their reflection.
2. Start by asking a student to volunteer to share 1-2 sentences that they wrote. Instruct them to “popcorn” another student.
3. Repeat until all the students have shared.
4. Thank all the students for sharing and express gratitude for the learning you have done together.
WORKS CITED
 
 
 
Duignan, Peter J. Making and Remaking America: Immigration into the United States. Hoover Institution, hoover.org, Sept. 15, 2003. Web, accessed July 7, 2016. http://www.hoover.org/research/making-and-remaking-america-immigration-united-states.
 
Hill, Ruth A. R.A.C.E.S Writing Strategy. YouTube, youtube.cm, Mar. 24, 2015. Web, accessed July 20, 2016. Run time 2:08. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0zB3KTdRng.
 
Hing, Bill O. Defending the Unpopular Immigrant. Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles Untold Civil Rights Stories, advancingjustice-la.org, 2009. Web, accessed June 10, 2017. https://advancingjustice-la.org/what-we-do/leadership-development/untold-civil-rights-stories.
 
Newnham, Nicole and David Grabias. Sentenced Home. PBS Independent Lens, pbs.org, 2006. Web, accessed July 7, 2016. http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/sentencedhome/index.html.
 
Newsela staff. GOP Candidate Trump Wants to Send You Home if You’re in U.S. Illegally. Associated Press, adapted by Newsela staff, newsela.org, Nov. 22, 2015. Web, accessed July 1, 2016. https://newsela.com/articles/trump-immigration/id/13009/.
 
Newsela staff. Lawmaker Proposes Dropping the Word ‘alien’ to describe immigrants. Cronkite News, adapted by Newsela staff, newsela.org, Nov. 25, 2015. Web, accessed June 21, 2016. https://newsela.com/articles/alien-immigrationlanguage/id/13102/.
 
Newsela staff. Pro/Con – dealing with the ‘children’s border crisis. McClatchy-Tribune News Service, adapated by Newsela staff, newsela.org, Aug. 18, 2014. Web, accessed June 9, 2017. https://newsela.com/articles/borderchildren-procon/id/4767/.
 
Zwiers, Jeff and Marie Crawford. How to Start Academic Conversations. Educational Leadership, April 2009. PDF file, accessed June 9, 2017.

Curriculum Developer:
Luis Antezana
Unit Plan: Fight for Just Immigration in a
Nation of Native Americans and Immigrants >
Curriculum Contributors:
Prabhneek Heer, Teofanny Saragi
Untold Civil Rights Stories Main Page >

 

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